Nuclear trifecta: Rising seas, earthquakes and economics mean end is in sight for many East Coast reactors

From our friends at Green World

GreenWorld

The Pilgrim reactor. Much of this site would be under water if sea levels rise as predicted. Photo by cryptome.org The Pilgrim reactor. Much of this site would be under water if sea levels rise as predicted. Photo by cryptome.org

The question of the day is not whether more U.S. reactors will permanently close over the next few years, it’s how many–especially on the East Coast–still will be operating by the end of this decade.

Simple economics, driven by accelerating deployment of renewables and low natural gas prices, already threaten the operation of several East Coast reactors, most notably FitzPatrick in New York and Pilgrim in Massachusetts. If reactors are continually losing money, their utilities will close them, no matter what the utility bosses may say about how much they love nuclear power. That’s the entire reason the new industry group Nuclear Matters exists–to try to salvage what the industry can out of its uneconomic reactors and keep as many of them running as possible.

But economics is no longer…

View original post 988 more words

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About residentsorganizedforasafeenvironment

Vision for ROSE Working for the good of the Mother Earth. To provide a safe and clean planet for our children and grandchildren, and the seven generations to come. Working to support Ethically Sound Environmental decisions for the future. We hold the power of our vision in our own hands.
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